tombennet

List of Nepenthes species, with elevation & temperature

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Hi everyone.

I've built an interactive guide to Nepenthes species: 
https://www.carnivorousplants.co.uk/resources/nepenthes-interactive-guide/

It includes a lowland/highland temperature chart, and a species list which can be sorted by altitudinal range or alphabetically, as required. I've also created a hybrid calculator, which can estimate the ideal conditions for a hybrid based on its parents' habitats. Many thanks to Rob Cantley of BE for suggesting this feature.

I hope other growers find this useful. I'm keen to update and improve it based on feedback - several people have suggested a 'sort by country/geography' feature for the species list, which I'm currently working on. Any other ideas, please just shout. :smile:

Cheers,

Tom

Edited by tombennet
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Its allways good to revamp an old idea.  Very usefull though!

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Superb - now I can see what's worth trying in my conditions easily!  Thanks for this, really useful :rolleyes:

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It is very useful. Thanks. But have one question. Why did not you do non hybrid calculator? In hybrid calculator write kind of nepenthes and I see min/max temperature but If I want know temperature range non hybrid spieces, I must trying with diagram. I think that such a posibility for non hybrid would be good.

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12 hours ago, manders said:

Its allways good to revamp an old idea.  Very usefull though!

Didn't you also make charts? I can't find them

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1 hour ago, Tropicat said:

Didn't you also make charts? I can't find them

Yes, it was sometime around mid/late 2000's.  Dicon also made a version which accounted for latitude.  Should be on here somewhere or i can repost them.  In my view there are 4 numbers that are relevant for each species, min/max temperature at average altitude.  Min temperature at max altitude and Max temperature at minimum altitude.

The plants don't always obey the 'rules' though, lol.

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On 1-11-2009 at 7:09 AM, Entwadumela said:

Hiya Fellow Nep Heads-

A fellow nep grower created this chart for his own reference, but I asked if I could share it with other growers and he said yes, but remember this is just a general range, not something set in stone.

The author mentions: "They show typical day and night temp at each extreme of the altitude range and the big band in the middle gives the day / night extreme at the average altitude of its range. They are all theoretical (i.e. I didn't go there and measure it) and they don't take into account the attitude of the plants to the sun! So use with caution."

4047490051_149c10df95_o.jpg

4047489741_3ae802232e_o.jpg

Hope this comes in handy.

E

found!

Edited by Tropicat

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Thanks for all the positive feedback everyone, really glad other growers find the tool useful.

12 hours ago, Jurkylius said:

It is very useful. Thanks. But have one question. Why did not you do non hybrid calculator? In hybrid calculator write kind of nepenthes and I see min/max temperature but If I want know temperature range non hybrid spieces, I must trying with diagram. I think that such a posibility for non hybrid would be good.

Good question - originally, I intended for people to simply find a species in the list, and then consult the corresponding region of the temperature chart. My decision not to calculate an exact corresponding temperature bracket for each species' elevation was deliberate, since such numbers are only estimates and - as @manders rightly points out - plants don't always play by the rules.

The hybrid calculator was added a few weeks later, along with some heavy caveats around data accuracy. I will happily add single-species calculations if enough people want them, however I'm reluctant to clutter the interface, which I feel is quite beginner-friendly as it stands.

As a workaround, I suggest you simply select the same species for both parents (e.g. N. maxima x N. maxima). This will give you the same result. 

3 hours ago, Tropicat said:

found!

Cheers for sharing, and thanks to the creator of this chart. I saw this chart and several others like it before I began developing my tool. My goal was essentially to make a comprehensive, interactive, web-based version which can be updated continuously (and collaboratively, if other developers are keen to help :smile:).

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5 hours ago, Tropicat said:

found!

Yep, that was it.  There was also a version in alphabetical order to make looking up particular species easier.

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5 hours ago, Tropicat said:

found!

There's an important point in there, that being that this doesn't account for whether the plants grow in more shaded or sunny areas. There can be quite a large difference in temperature between sitting in the sun and in the shade (hence people claiming it was 50C in their back garden, when really their thermometer was just sitting on a dark surface in bright sunlight). I suppose that would be the next level up for these charts' accuracy/use, although this would be a much harder task considering the need for precise habitat descriptions.

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I know plants don't  play by the rules. This is only for optimal temperature range. For example I grow N. diatas in day temperature around 27 °C and grows very well. Using same spieces in hybrid calculator is good idea. Very useful website. Thanks again.

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I know plants don't  play by the rules. This is only for optimal temperature range. For example I grow N. diatas in day temperature around 27 °C and grows very well. Using same spieces in hybrid calculator is good idea. Very useful website. Thanks again.

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12 hours ago, AKR said:

There's an important point in there, that being that this doesn't account for whether the plants grow in more shaded or sunny areas. There can be quite a large difference in temperature between sitting in the sun and in the shade (hence people claiming it was 50C in their back garden, when really their thermometer was just sitting on a dark surface in bright sunlight). I suppose that would be the next level up for these charts' accuracy/use, although this would be a much harder task considering the need for precise habitat descriptions.

Isn't temperature always measured in the shade officially?

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13 hours ago, Tropicat said:

Isn't temperature always measured in the shade officially?

Yes - that's why the temperatures given can only really be a rough guide. A lot of factors start coming into play when you're dealing with direct sunlight, such as how sheltered from the wind the place is, how light-absorbent the surroundings are etc. 

Edited by AKR

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Here is a question that has been on my mind. These nepenthes grow in very high altitudes sometimes, with lower atmospheric pressure than what we experience at home. I wonder if this factor has any influence on their growth at all.

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Not sure about atmospheric pressure but certainly things like UV radiation and light levels overall are far higher at high altitude.  The mystery to me has sometimes been seeing e.g. orchids grow in full high-altitude tropical sun and when you try that in the UK they burn badly.

On another point, there is a huge difference in local microclimates at the same altitude.  Out in the sun on white sand it will be really hot and maybe dry, inside a forest it will be cool and humid, and that can change can happen of over a distance of a few metres.

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11 hours ago, manders said:

The mystery to me has sometimes been seeing e.g. orchids grow in full high-altitude tropical sun and when you try that in the UK they burn badly.

Possibly due to the seasonality of our light levels? It's often the case that leaves produced under a certain set of conditions don't like change, for example leaves produced under low light conditions will burn under high light, whereas leaves produced under intense light are more resistant to it.

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57 minutes ago, AKR said:

Possibly due to the seasonality of our light levels? It's often the case that leaves produced under a certain set of conditions don't like change, for example leaves produced under low light conditions will burn under high light, whereas leaves produced under intense light are more resistant to it.

Could well be true.  Humidity maybe a factor as well.

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Hi all. I've updated the Nepenthes guide with some new features.

First, you can now filter the distribution chart to show only species which grow in a particular location. Hit the ‘Enable Region Control’ button and tick the boxes of the locations you’re interested in. You can choose multiple locations at once. Hit ‘Go’, and the chart will be filtered and sorted based on your chosen configuration. Lots of people requested this feature - thanks to everyone who made the suggestion.

Second, the calculator can now be used to visualise the altitudinal distribution of a single species, as opposed to just hybrids. Several growers have told me they like using the calculator for this purpose, including @Jurkylius earlier in this thread. Rather than forcing a visualisation by entering N. lowii x N. lowii, for example, you can now just select one species and see it plotted on the chart.

As always, feedback / suggestions are appreciated. Hope everyone finds these features useful.

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