titankilller1231

Does anyone keep their sarracenia outside?

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I have a sarracenia cv Eva and a sarracenia purpurea burkei (divided into 3 plants) and I was wondering if anyone kept their plants outside all year long as I have seen pics of sarracenia covered in snow or living in Canada

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Yep, a few people have outside bog gardens. Sarracenia purpurea ssp. purpurea will thrive and certain flavas will do ok. Others will just survive or slowly decline.

Being a continental climate Canada tends to have consistently warm summers, not our hit and miss seasons though.

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On 24 April 2017 at 9:13 PM, titankilller1231 said:

 

I have a sarracenia cv Eva and a sarracenia purpurea burkei (divided into 3 plants) and I was wondering if anyone kept their plants outside all year long as I have seen pics of sarracenia covered in snow or living in Canada

 

A lot depends on where in the U.K. you live and is your garden sheltered. Here in Devon I grow a lot in trays as I don't have a greenhouse or a garden. But I do have a backyard full of sarras, vft's pings and a very small area in the middle for my chair. They get frosted every year so I leave the old growth on as a little protection.

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8 minutes ago, ian said:

A lot depends on where in the U.K. you live and is your garden sheltered. Here in Devon I grow a lot in trays as I don't have a greenhouse or a garden. But I do have a backyard full of sarras, vft's pings and a very small area in the middle for my chair. They get frosted every year so I leave the old growth on as a little protection.

With luck my plants should be OK outside, perhaps going in a shed if the weather gets really bad.  I'm only just starting at this, so not sure about anything yet!

You say you keep yours in trays, Ian.  I'll be doing the same as I don't want to put up a greenhouse.  Any chance of a picture so I can see what you mean?

Guy

 

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As Ian says a lot depends on where you are. In the uk. I grow nearly all mine outside in the Midlands. They should be fine outside, however the Purpurea Burkei, is nowhere near as hardy as var purpurea so may need some protection in winter.

S. 'Eva' exact parentage is not known but it is thought to be S. X 'Juthatip Soper' with mitchelliana backcrossed with leucophylla, so should be relatively hardy

Cheers

Steve

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A lot depends on where in the U.K. you live and is your garden sheltered. Here in Devon I grow a lot in trays as I don't have a greenhouse or a garden. But I do have a backyard full of sarras, vft's pings and a very small area in the middle for my chair. They get frosted every year so I leave the old growth on as a little protection.

That's great thanks I live in hampshire and the garden is quite sheltered but at the moment we are getting sub 0 temps at night

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On 26 April 2017 at 8:58 AM, Guy said:

With luck my plants should be OK outside, perhaps going in a shed if the weather gets really bad.  I'm only just starting at this, so not sure about anything yet!

You say you keep yours in trays, Ian.  I'll be doing the same as I don't want to put up a greenhouse.  Any chance of a picture so I can see what you mean?

Guy

 

Sorry Guy

I can't do pictures but if you have a Wilco's they sell black plastic trays measuring 38cm x 24cm x 6cm. Usually £1 each.  You can fit 3 rows of 5,  7.5cm square pots in snuggley. I tier mine on blue plastic mushroom trays (free from veg shop) so the back row is slightly higher than the middle row which in turn is higher than the front row. If you have a look at multimamat's sales listing the black trays are used as a back drop to the sarras. Hope this helps.

Ian.

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I grow Darlingtonia outside but I can never get it to flower, but that's just me, it's turning into the quest for the Holy Grail for me to get it to flower.  It used to be growing Drosophyllum but I've cracked that now.  

I grew my Sarracenia and Dionaea plants for a few years outside but some of them never thrived, although I didn't lose any.  From my reading over the years you can have quite a bit of success growing these outside if they're planted in a bog garden rather than kept in pots.  Then if you cover them with a thick layer of burlap in the winter this will provide quite a bit of protection.  

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17 hours ago, titankilller1231 said:


Thanks I have always wondered what Eva meant, I thought it was a bit vague

See below link for cultivar registration of EVA, it also has the registration for vogel, which is linked to it. Interesting reading, as far as I'm aware at carniflora they have many plants which are open pollinated and from the resulting seedlings they pick out those with some potential.

http://www.carnivorousplants.org/cpn/Species/v43n4p135_137.html

I grow both eva and purp venosa burkei (or rosea if you prefer) outside year round along with all my sarracenias. However that does include some watching of upcoming weather and strategic placement of pots.

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4 hours ago, Richard Bunn said:

I grow Darlingtonia outside but I can never get it to flower, but that's just me, it's turning into the quest for the Holy Grail for me to get it to flower.  It used to be growing Drosophyllum but I've cracked that now.

 

Richard

I grow my Darlingtonia in those cheap and nasty Poundland rafia woven hanging baskets with the plastic liners. These are then hung in a sunny spot or on the washing line and can be moved as the sun goes round. Most plants have 3 flowers on. Who needs to dry clothes on a line.   ( My wife )  oops.

Ian.

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I grow all my sarras outside in Belgium (i.e. summers slightly warmer than in southern England). The growth period is shorter than in greenhouse; some plants (but not all) are less coloured, and some are slightly smaller. The second crop of pitchers of the leucos usually develops too late and is short-living with poor colours. Otherwise, they grow very well on my terrasse. When you grow your plants outside you almost never get botrytis problems. When the weather get cold, you just have to mulch them properly. I think that the true limiting factor is not the low winter temperatures but the low summer temperatures.

Edited by Cedric-666

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Purpurea, flava and oreophila have been outside here for 30+ years.  Dionae grow and slowly spread outside but never look as good as really well grown plants.  The main problem outside is the wind blows the flava trumpets down and the look a mess.

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Everything apart from S. purpurea goes into slow decline for me outdoors, and even that won't flower. Wind and non-summers at 270m ASL this far north does them in. They grow well and flower in a greenhouse though, even the warmer-growing species - it makes the difference.

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It is true that the wind is a problem when growing tall sarras outdoors. I use grids to support them.

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On 01/05/2017 at 9:06 AM, AKR said:

Everything apart from S. purpurea goes into slow decline for me outdoors, and even that won't flower. Wind and non-summers at 270m ASL this far north does them in. They grow well and flower in a greenhouse though, even the warmer-growing species - it makes the difference.

We are lucky over here on the west coast, generally warmer winters than inland.  The VFTs dont even die off over most winters.  

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Im growing my sarra's outside in pots, unprotected from the environment. I have done this for a few years now, and they have done very well for me. But now some pretty bad frost is coming our way. It may get down to -10 C here. Bcs of the wind they predicted it can feel like -15C.
How low can they go? I read online that they can take around 0C. Has anyone found the bottomline yet? Is it better to keep them dryer? 

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I`m growing my sarravenias outside in a bog without any protection . Here in the Black Forest/Germany I had temperatures down to - 15°C. At the moment -11 C. I had no losses due to the low temperatures over the years.

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They can take some very low temps (mine have been down to minus 15 in the past) without too much detriment, however it’s frequent freeze thaw cycles that cause problems and freezing temps with desiccating winds effectively freeze drying the plant.

Dryer is commonly said to be better than wet, although I have both conditions and the plants have been OK.

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I'm in the Peak District and keep most of mine in a polytunnel.  However I have a few large planters outside all year containing Darlingtonia, Sarracenia, Pinguicula and Drosera.  They manage fine, although I am debating moving them to a more sheltered location given this extreme cold snap.

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I'm with 'manders' on this one, its heavy wind or rain that causes the most damage to my outside plants in southern England. 

All my favourites live in a makeshift coldframe/house protected from the weather damage. My divisions however have to fend for themselves.

I've had no losses but snapped pitchers is common, they are currently sitting under 6 inches of snow, poor loves !!!!

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I live in Watford just north of London. I've had S. flava  maxima outside for 30 years no troubles. And flava burgundy for many years. Purpurea purpurea, absolulutely loves it! A few other Sarras out there at the moment, waiting to see the results. Had several Dionaeas outside for a couple of winters no trouble, they just need clever shelter from wind. At the moment an S. psittacina is going through its first outside winter - so far so good. Also a Darlingtonia outside going through its first winter. They are all in bog gardens.

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We had minus 9 last night in Kent, that's the lowest temperature my plants have been down to so far so I guess we'll have to wait and see if there's any distress.

I 'm more concerned about my cephalotus collection as they're ideally not supposed to go below minus 7 

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It was -5 in my greenhouse last night! It's my first winter with CP's so I'm a bit nervous.

I'm in Sheffield just off the end of the Pennines.

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