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RL7836

U. asplundii x U. jamesoniana

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A while back, I crossed U. asplundii with U. jamesoniana (both directions) but only the seeds from the U. asplundii seed parent germinated.

Here's two pics of the mother's flowers (seed parent):

Uasplundii052311RS.jpgUasplundiiP4060511RS.jpg

.... and a pic of Dad's flower (pollen parent):

Ujamesoniana3-4052812RS.jpg

I planted seedlings both in netpots (in live LFS) & one on treefern. The one on treefern flowered before the others:

Front

Uasplundiixjamesflowerfront081813RS.jpg

Side

Uasplundiixjamesflowerside081813RS.jpg

Plant (tuber in middle/right of pic - below largest leaf)

Uasplundiixjamesplant081813RS.jpg

The hybrid appears to have grabbed most of it's appearance from the asplundii side. My complete inability to ever produce viable seeds from either selfing or crossing my asplundii clones does lead me to believe that these plants are indeed the hybrid.

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Great job and beautiful photos. I was wondering why no one haven't jet made this crossing. I was guessing that it have been made, but those who did it, are waiting for the flowers to appear, to show the result. The hybrid looks nice. Could you write what temperatures and under what light you are growing it?

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Wow.

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Honestly, I'm not convinced this is a hybrid. It just look like you successfully managed to your U. asplundii this time.

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I was wondering why no one haven't jet made this crossing.
I don't think there are many utric growers out there - and even fewer who grow Orchidioides & then very few who grow U. jamesoniana. In my experience, U. jamesoniana can be more difficult than the larger utrics. Barry Rice has been able to grow it in a hanging basket with 1:1 - LFS:perlite. If I try that, the tubers always rot when it goes into rest mode. Also, unlike other CPs (like Neps, Helis & Sarrs), crosses frequently won't take (although I do have one more new cross coming - that I'll share once the flowers pops).
Could you write what temperatures and under what light you are growing it?
The tanks are in my basement & I try to get HL or close conditions. Winter is roughly(day/night) 68/58*F & summer is 10*F warmer (or ~20/14*C in winter & 26/20*C in summer) - although earlier this summer we had a heat wave where some of the tanks were seeing ~30*C during the day.

Lighting is currently a mix of various fluorescent fixtures - depending on the tank (power compacts, T-8's & T-5's). I'm trying to move toward a standard T-5 fixture but haven't been too happy with our selection of lamps. About the time I get everything under T-5's - it will be time to switch to LEDs -- and maybe then I'll actually have a greenhouse ... :girl_witch:

Honestly, I'm not convinced this is a hybrid. It just look like you successfully managed to your U. asplundii this time.
I suspected that there would be some who doubt this cross - I'm also not 100% convinced. However, given my dificulties in producing viable seed (many, many attempts) as well as the apparent differences in the flowers - i suspect that it is the real thing. Given the similarities with the two species - what other differences would be expected? Possibly a greater difference in size?

Either way, I'm interested to hear other opinions and also to see results of others who make the cross....

Edited by RL7836

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Thank you Ron for your answer.

I think that it is a real crossing. Considering how the mother plants looks like, the offspring has differences from both of them and some similarities. It was more likely, that the plant will inherit the size from U. aslpundii and the most visible change would be in the flower. Especially, that it was the mother plant.

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Don't expect the offsprings of self-pollinated U. asplundii to be exactly the same as the parent U. asplundii!!! This is a great mistake. There can be great variations among all those new plants.

How the lower lip is divided is not really significant. The proportion of this lip compared to the spur is the main criterion used to discriminate both species. Here it is approximatively the same size as the spur, just like for U. asplundii. I would expect the plant to be intermediate in size between both species. another criterion would be the pubescence on vegetative parts that is absent from U. jamesoniana but this is more speculative.

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