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chj93

Nepenthes fluid level?

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Hi, I'm wondering if you can help me. Something which has always occured for me is that whenever pitchers open on my Nepenthes, they always have very little quantities of fluid. The pitchers do properly form though. For example, in previous years I have had lovely bulbous pitchers from my Alata hybrids measuring around 8 inches long, just with very scant amounts of fluid within them which did not seem capable of digesting anything.

Most recently my Sanguinea has opened up two new pitchers. Both measure around 6 inches long, but the fluid level in both occupies only the bottom 1/8th of the pitcher - I actually put my plant outside in the garden today and this quantity of fluid is surely going to be totally inadequate - I would imagine anything more than a couple of insects would rise above the fluid and begin to rot. On Sanguineas particularly, I have noticed that the bottom half of the pitcher is a much more bulbous shape than the slender top half, so should the fluid be filling this section? At least then the is plenty of space in the bottom of the pitcher for insects to sink and be digested below the top surface of the liquid.

What is causing this strange issue? Could the pitchers produce more fluid even though they are fully open and no longer developing? What can I do to ensure future pitchers start producing more copious amounts of fluid? I have heard that the amount of sun the plant is given can influence the quantity of fluid produced, but when the plant has managed to produce these two pitchers under its own steam surely the amount of sun it is receiving is fine?

Many thanks :thumbsup:

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I just noticed this in my Ventrata in the living room. The first pitcher of the season only opened a couple of days ago and doesn't have the usual amount of fluid in. I'm wondering if it's because it doesn't get sprayed with water very often. About twice in every 10-12 days. The soil is always kept moist enough though.

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I just noticed this in my Ventrata in the living room. The first pitcher of the season only opened a couple of days ago and doesn't have the usual amount of fluid in. I'm wondering if it's because it doesn't get sprayed with water very often. About twice in every 10-12 days. The soil is always kept moist enough though.

Whatever is causing it I'm finding it puzzling. So usually then are your pitchers say half full with fluid?

Is your first pitcher of the season any good? One of the first opened on one of my DeRoose Alatas a few days ago and is about 5 inches long. Not too bad I wouldn't say but I've had larger. :thumbsup:

Edited by chj93

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Yeah mine are usually fairly full. I just noticed that my ventricosa has just popped open today and is reasonably full. It's difficult to say how good the pitchers on either of these are as the Ventrata is a year away from maturity (possibly 2) and ventricosa is 3-4 years off.

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Hi,

From my experience the fluid level in pitchers depends mostly from the species (or hybrid). Some produce more, some produce less. From my experience with lowland species I can tell you that for example: ampullaria, bicalcarata, hirusta produce lot of liquid. Rafflesiana in the other hand produce very very thick jelly thing - like gastric acid :) (at least one form of raff is doing that). Chang in the other hand have very little of fluid.

Of course important factor is also environment. In very hot conditions it is possible that some of the fluid will evaporate. Another factor might be watering - If you keep your plants dry or not wet enough.

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