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Martin Hingst

Grevillea in SW Western Australia

14 posts in this topic

Hi,

for those of you who are interested in the Western Australian flora, an overview to this wonderful genus of the Proteaceae family, Grevillea.

Equally impressive as the Banksia, and equally colourful and rich in species - what makes the identification not easy. It took me hours - and even with good literature, I am to totally sure with the one or the other. So if anyone knows better, any corrections of species names are welcome.

I'll focus on the south western floral province, and at its most northern point near Geraldton, where I found this lovely species, G. annulifera:

gannuliferageraldton1.jpg

The plant in its environment - easy to see from a distance:

gannuliferageraldton2.jpg

Totally different in colour and shape - G. petrophiloides:

gpetrophiloidesgeraldto.jpg

Everywhere along the roads we spotted these beautiful plants. Near Badgingarra we had some time for a little stop. First plant that hit the eye was Grevillea eriostachya with its brilliant yellow flowers:

geriostachyabadgingarra.jpg

geriostachyabadgingarra.jpg

G. pinaster:

gpinasterbadgingarra4.jpg

Probably a fililoba hybrid:

gfililobacultivar.jpg

Some more miles southeast, into the Dryandra Forest: G. cagiana. I am not too happy with my ID here, but anyway great colours:

gcagianalolgray.jpg

Near Raventhorpe grew G. patentiloba:

gpatentilobaraventhorpe.jpg

And down to the South coast in the Fitzgerald NP this neat little thing, G. fasciculata:

gfasciculatafitzgerald.jpg

But the absolute Grevillea highlight was the street from Kondinin to Hyden. Not easy to get going, I could have stopped eyery few meters. Some day I'll have to do it again - by feet ;-)

Maybe G. cagiana again (maybe not...)

gcagianavorhyden.jpg

The noble G. excelsior:

gexcelsior1lgtohyden5.jpg

gexcelsior2lgtohyden.jpg

gexcelsior3lgtohyden.jpg

gexcelsior4lgtohyden.jpg

G. hookeriana ssp. apiciloba:

ghookerianaapicilobatoh.jpg

G. insignis:

ginsignistohyden.jpg

and finally, G. pilosa:

gpilosatohyden2.jpg

So - theres definately more to see than CPs in WA! Hope you like it -

Martin

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If it's true that a picture can speak a thousand words, then: :shock::tu::shock::tu::shock::tu::shock::tu:

...that'll probably do! :D Thanks for sharing!

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Hi Martin,

nice pictures and intersting plants! Thanks for showing! I still did not start trying to identify the other plants we found during our trip, but the plant of the following two pictures look like it could be a member of that genus as well.

http://utricularia.net/sonstiges/WA_2011/IMG_10260.jpg

http://utricularia.net/sonstiges/WA_2011/IMG_10278.php

Christian

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Thanks !

Christian, yes, this is a Grevillea too - my guess is G. patentiloba (pretty sure).

Leaves look different than in my plant above, because it is a different subspecies,

Yours is G. patentiloba ssp. patentiloba, the plant on my picture was G. patentiloba ssp. platypoda.

Nice pictures :-) and always worth a photo, isn't it ;-)

Regards

Martin

Edited by Martin Hingst

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Hi Martin,

thanks! So, one more mystery solved. I still have lots of plants without names ;)

Christian

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Hi,

though not a field pic, but a plant in cultivation, I wanted to add a photo from today of one of my Grevilleas.

Finally, I have an adequate winter ground for my plants. My SW Australian species seem to like it!

88oi.jpg

Here a pic from my poly tent - quite spacy... ;-)

e2p9.jpg

Regards

Martin

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Hi Martin,

really spacy. :laugh2:

Wow, very interesting and beautiful plants, thanks for posting these pictures.

Best regards,

Daniel

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Martin,

Thanks for sharing. I'm also quite interested in the genius Protacea. I do grow some Protea and Banksia species. This year I will have my first flower of Banksia ericifolia...

Michael

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Cool - thats a nice species! How big is yours? Do you also grow coccinea?

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Hi Martin,

The B.ericifolia is about 0.7m tall. It has two flower buds, but I think it will need a few weeks until the flowers are open. I have sown B. coccinea last year, one seed has germinated, but the seedling was killed by funghi. I will try sowing B. coccinea again in March.

Last year I have tried to make a cutting of B. ericifolia, which was sucessful - it seems that it is not too difficult to propagate Proteacea by cuttings.

I had a look at your topics of Proteaceae with great interest - do you have some pictures of Hakea victoriae? This one I will also try in spring - I have made the experience that Hakea are more easy to grow then most other members of the Proteaceae family.

Edited by Michael Z

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Banksia ericifolia flower bud....

gallery_3193_758_84729.jpg

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Great! That will be a nice sight when it opens. Looking forward to more pics of it then.

Thanks

Martin

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Thank you for sharing this beautiful pictures.

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