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rsivertsen

My Aldrovanda Pond

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In Nieuwkoop they grow in acid water. Lots of sphagnum grows there along the wateredge. And Drosera rotundifolia. Also 3 Utricularia share the habitad of Aldrovanda. U. vulgaris, U. neglecta and U. minor.

I guess they like it acid, but not to much.

Alexander

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Would pine needles help?

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I have Aldrovanda also naturalized in a sphagnum bog with acidic peaty water, and although they grow, they are visibly smaller than the population in the other site where there is an abundance of clay. It seems to grow best in a shallow fresh water marsh rather than a typical sphagnum bog/pond.

This plant is NOT easy to naturalize, and fears of it becoming a feral nuisance weed is grossly overestimated. The fact is that it is going extinct in its natural habitats, including Japan, and we really don't know exactly why. It seems that birds and other creatures may feed on them, especially when they're in dormant turions. I've seen other birds swoop down and scoop up a few for nest building. Turtles will also have a feast on these plants. Several countries have already lost their native populations of this plant. - Rich

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I'm not sure how happy they are, but the 2" cuttings I received are ~6-8" and branching:

Picture001-25.jpg

Picture003-22.jpg

My bog experiment failed. I suspect that the critters found them to their delight. The are untouched in the fishtank, though.

Edited by jimscott

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I have Aldrovanda also naturalized in a sphagnum bog with acidic peaty water, and although they grow, they are visibly smaller than the population in the other site where there is an abundance of clay. It seems to grow best in a shallow fresh water marsh rather than a typical sphagnum bog/pond.

This plant is NOT easy to naturalize, and fears of it becoming a feral nuisance weed is grossly overestimated. The fact is that it is going extinct in its natural habitats, including Japan, and we really don't know exactly why. It seems that birds and other creatures may feed on them, especially when they're in dormant turions. I've seen other birds swoop down and scoop up a few for nest building. Turtles will also have a feast on these plants. Several countries have already lost their native populations of this plant. - Rich

Well extinctions has probably to do with the runof of poluted water from farmland where they use a lot of fertilizer and pesticides. In Europe at least that has been proven very bad for funerables habitads like bogs!

Alexander

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