tropicbreeze

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tropicbreeze last won the day on November 18 2013

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About tropicbreeze

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    Noonamah, Australia
  1. Thanks Gary. I've had that happen to me before as well. I really got into Aroids some time ago and managed to get quite a collection. Still can't resist anything really unusual. This is a list of what I have but only at genus level. The species list is a bit too long and some I'm not sure which species they are. Aglaonema Alocasia Amorphophallus Amydrium Anchomanes Anthurium Caladium Colocasia Cyrtosperma Dieffenbachia Dracontium Epipremnum Gonatopus Lagenandra Lasia Monstera Philodendron Pistia Pothos Rhaphidophora Scindapsus Spathiphyllum Syngonium Typhonium Typhonodorum Urospatha Xanthosoma Zamioculcas
  2. Thanks Gary. I've had that happen to me before as well. I really got into Aroids some time ago and managed to get quite a collection. Still can't resist anything really unusual. This is a list of what I have but only at genus level. The species list is a bit too long and some I'm not sure which species they are. Aglaonema Alocasia Amorphophallus Amydrium Anchomanes Anthurium Caladium Colocasia Cyrtosperma Dieffenbachia Dracontium Epipremnum Gonatopus Lagenandra Lasia Monstera Philodendron Pistia Pothos Rhaphidophora Scindapsus Spathiphyllum Syngonium Typhonium Typhonodorum Urospatha Xanthosoma Zamioculcas
  3. I can see the images clearly. Do you see image place holders below the text or just nothing there except text? I wonder if anyone else has that problem.
  4. Just finished flowering now but it tends to flower throughout much of the year. For a water/bog aroid it has a very large inflorescence, around 60cms from the top of the spathe to the bottom of the spathe. Plants get to a height of around 3 metres and stall there. This is a photo of mine at the 3 metre mark back in 2010 with an adult for size comparison. It was already about 4 years old and flowering And this is just the other day, about 7 years later, and no size difference. Of course the pond has become a bit over grown and crowded with other plants. Nothing remains static in gardens (hopefully anyway).
  5. That's Taeniophyllum, they're really interesting. The roots have become the leaves and have chlorophyll to carry out photosynthesis. We have a leafless native orchid here, Dipodium stenocheilum, which is a terrestrial. But it's a saprophyte and has a symbiotic relationship with fungi to produce it's food rather than by photosynthesis.
  6. All the Cyrtospermas are tropical but some people manage to keep them indoors, although they can get quite large especially C. merkusii. They're bog plants so need lots of water. I have a lot of mine in pots sitting in ponds. Those not in ponds need to be kept very wet. I knew someone who had a C. johnstonii in the ground next to a sprinkler. The sprinkler played up one day and they lost the plant. They mostly have very prickly stems which, with their size, puts a lot of people off from growing them. They're not very common but some nurseries here have them from time to time. I got some of mine from Equatorial Exotics in Cairns and some from Territory Exotics in Humpty Doo.
  7. It prompted me to consider planting some around a fountain I have. I checked some of the Phal. species online and found quite a few that could be good contenders, particularly some that grow on limestone cliffs. Problem is that although there are a lot of Phals being sold in nurseries and big stores here, they're mostly just labeled "Orchid", no chance of finding out what they're hybrids of.
  8. Surprised there's not a lot of moss growing around those roots. Was it too exposed to full sun?
  9. What made you think it was extinct there? I'd have thought waterbirds would have been spreading it around all the time so that while local extinctions are possible, so are natural re-introductions.
  10. Although this one has been flowering for a number of years it was only last year that it first produced some berries. Only put them in the soil around the base of the plant but they didn't come up. So hoping that this year there might be more berries and that I'll have better luck some seed growing.
  11. Don't hate me Nigel , but my place is just over 9 hectares with about 30% of that laterite, as a mixture of fine soil and/or fine gravels up to metre diameter rocks. Lateritic soils would be the most dominant type in this area and because we have many native CP's it's not unusual to see some of them in this type of soil. Cheers, Zig
  12. Thanks Nigel. So I gather you're wanting to try it in the soil type it naturally grows in. I initially thought there may be some characteristics of laterite that made it good for growing CPs, but I see where you're coming from. Here I've seen D. burmanni and D. dilatatopetiolaris growing naturally in lateritic soil, though not exclusively. Cheers Zig
  13. I'm curious to know what's the interest in laterite. Haven't heard anything about it's use for plants, always imagined there'd be an imbalance of iron and possibly aluminium. So I'm keen to find out if it'd be useful for me (well, my plants actually).
  14. Thanks for the comment Manders. It does get a bit complicated. I think they did over do it with the slow release. There was a lot all through the soil and then a handful of it sitting on top of the soil. The plant is starting to develop a lot of new pitchers now but we're in our wet season. There's also 3 new shoots coming up from the soil. This morning it was 30C and 90% humidity, but dry season it'll be far from that.
  15. Thanks TCurrel. Funnily enough, the advice on the tag that was on the plant said not to give it fertiliser. However, the soil was full of it. The nursery that produced it doesn't seem too good at taking its own advice.