tropicbreeze

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tropicbreeze last won the day on November 18 2013

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About tropicbreeze

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    Noonamah, Australia
  1. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    That was Manders who had the A. peruvianum, not me. I wouldn't have expected any ferns to have flower-like fragrance. When I list them like that it does seem like quite a lot of ferns, but then my garden is outdoors and very large. Takes a lot of plants to fill it. I'll have to keep an eye out for that 'Blue Star'. Problem here though is that the only labels you get on ferns is "Fern", or "Foliage Plant". It's extremely rare to see an actual fern name.
  2. Dicksonia antarctica

    Looks like it's stooping under that ceiling. They can get a lot taller than that, if they don't bang their head on the way up.
  3. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    Don't know whether I've got any Phlebodium species, There's a lot of Polypodiaceae in my garden but I've never got around to getting them identified except for a couple of obvious ones. Many Polypodiaceae seem to cope well with a bit of heat and drying out. Drynaria quercifolia does very well but it's a native here and dormant in the dry season. Another native, which I suspect is Microsorum grossum, does well although doesn't go dormant. Microsorum musifolium (Crocodile Fern) struggles in the dry season but is good in the wet season. There's another two which might be Phlebodium but I just don't know. One short one carpets a large area and goes dormant. It looks good in the wet season. The other grows to about a metre, climbs a bit, doesn't go dormant but gets badly burned in direct afternoon sun during the dry season. It still looks good in the shade during the dry season, provided of course it's well watered. Those are Polypodiaceae. I've also got a couple of Nephrolepis species (or hybrids?), Marsilea drummondii (native), Acrostichum speciosum (native), Ceratopteris thalictroides (native), Pteris, Blechnum, plus a couple of others. The natives do have an advantage but their normal habitat is often permanently wet.
  4. Petiolaris complex sundew division

    I have D. dilatato-petiolaris growing but I think the problem most people have with them is they underestimate the conditions these plants need - intense sun, hot humidity and hot water.
  5. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    There are a lot of plants that cope really well here but as a gardener there's a lot more I'd like to grow. Every climate has its challenges so it's a matter of research and experimentation. Cacti don't do well here. The dry season's okay with clear skies and high temperatures, but come the wet season with heavy rain and constant high humidity they just rot. Although, I've got a couple of those tropical ones like Selenicereus chrysocardium which grows well but won't flower because nights just don't get cold enough. I've never had any luck with Dragon Fruit, Hylocereus undatus, but some people do grow it here, even commercially.
  6. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    For some reason this posted twice.
  7. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    I used to grow Platycerium years back when I lived down south. Had a huge P. superbum growing in a tree. Also had a lot of P. bifurcatum. Gave my father a small bifurcatum that he put in a tree. It grew to over 2 metres across. Eventually the tree died and collapsed under the weight. For up where I am now I got a number of small plants off it but they all eventually declined and died. One I have now is tiny and barely staying alive. Would like to try a P. veitchii, they're very drought tolerant and okay in heat. There's no indoor plants in my place, it's not really practical. Outdoors they're covered by the automatic irrigation system which comes on in the early hours of the morning and is off before the sun comes up. It keeps things going through the rest of the day. Daytime temperatures through the winter, our dry season, average 33C to 34C, although now, in late winter, we usually get 35C to 37C. When the rainy season comes it doesn't matter so much as the humidity is up as well. But that won't be until about October or November.
  8. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    As far as I'm aware there's only one Noonamah, no guessing Yes, this time of year humidity (or rather lack thereof) is a problem. Good thing A. philippense is deciduous, or goes dormant, and can completely dry out. On the other hand A. hispidulum doesn't go dormant but it can't completely dry out. But with the heat and low humidity we get during winter a lot of the 'shop bought' Adiantums just keel over. Come the wet season with hot humid weather they all do well. Fortunately there are some ferns that cope with that, but not enough of them for my liking. I also have a small treefern, Cyathea cooperi. After the demise of a few earlier on I'm now virtually flooding it during the dry season and hoping that when the wet season comes it won't drown. I do a lot of experimenting with plants, not always successfully.
  9. Adiantum peruvianum problems

    Your flat looks amazing. I had to look up where Watford is, came up with two places. I have two species of Adiantum, philippense and hispidulum. A few others I tried didn't last long. Got them labelled simply as "Fern". Although they were Adiantums don't know which species they were, probably hybrids.
  10. Arachnis flos-aeris

    I bought some cuttings of this orchid whith flowers on it some years back. Although the cuttings grew well they just wouldn't flower. Then someone told me they needed full sun, and a lot of it. So I set some up on a post in a pretty sunny position and they multiplied and then began to have flowers. This season they have 11 flower spikes, the best I've had so far. Because they multiply so easily I've got lots of them now but most are getting a bit too much shade. At least it looks like I've learned the tricks of flowering them.
  11. Typhonodorum lindleyanum

    Thanks Gary. I've had that happen to me before as well. I really got into Aroids some time ago and managed to get quite a collection. Still can't resist anything really unusual. This is a list of what I have but only at genus level. The species list is a bit too long and some I'm not sure which species they are. Aglaonema Alocasia Amorphophallus Amydrium Anchomanes Anthurium Caladium Colocasia Cyrtosperma Dieffenbachia Dracontium Epipremnum Gonatopus Lagenandra Lasia Monstera Philodendron Pistia Pothos Rhaphidophora Scindapsus Spathiphyllum Syngonium Typhonium Typhonodorum Urospatha Xanthosoma Zamioculcas
  12. Typhonodorum lindleyanum

    Thanks Gary. I've had that happen to me before as well. I really got into Aroids some time ago and managed to get quite a collection. Still can't resist anything really unusual. This is a list of what I have but only at genus level. The species list is a bit too long and some I'm not sure which species they are. Aglaonema Alocasia Amorphophallus Amydrium Anchomanes Anthurium Caladium Colocasia Cyrtosperma Dieffenbachia Dracontium Epipremnum Gonatopus Lagenandra Lasia Monstera Philodendron Pistia Pothos Rhaphidophora Scindapsus Spathiphyllum Syngonium Typhonium Typhonodorum Urospatha Xanthosoma Zamioculcas
  13. Typhonodorum lindleyanum

    I can see the images clearly. Do you see image place holders below the text or just nothing there except text? I wonder if anyone else has that problem.
  14. Typhonodorum lindleyanum

    Just finished flowering now but it tends to flower throughout much of the year. For a water/bog aroid it has a very large inflorescence, around 60cms from the top of the spathe to the bottom of the spathe. Plants get to a height of around 3 metres and stall there. This is a photo of mine at the 3 metre mark back in 2010 with an adult for size comparison. It was already about 4 years old and flowering And this is just the other day, about 7 years later, and no size difference. Of course the pond has become a bit over grown and crowded with other plants. Nothing remains static in gardens (hopefully anyway).
  15. Leafless orchid, Taeniophyllum sp.

    That's Taeniophyllum, they're really interesting. The roots have become the leaves and have chlorophyll to carry out photosynthesis. We have a leafless native orchid here, Dipodium stenocheilum, which is a terrestrial. But it's a saprophyte and has a symbiotic relationship with fungi to produce it's food rather than by photosynthesis.